Egosiliqua malusymphonicus, 2010; Hilarofustus atarium, 2010

Christopher Locke

Egosiliqua malusymphonicus, 2010

“That’s so last year.” We often remark how quickly technological gadgets become at least culturally obsolete. Christopher Locke’s fossilized iPod and Atari joystick, complete with Latinate terminology, are a humorous take on what science fiction author Bruce Sterling fondly refers to as “dead media”—obsolete and forgotten communications technologies. According to Locke: Egosiliqua malusymphonicus is first seen in 2001 and remains today in several forms, most closely resembling this one. Some speculate it evolved from Ambulephebus sonysymphonia (commonly referred to as the Walkman), while others suspect Egosiliqua was the natural predator whose presence led to the eventual extinction of Ambulephebus.


 
 
Image courtesy of the artist.

Image courtesy of the artist.

Image courtesy of the artist.

Image courtesy of the artist.


Hilarofustus atarium, 2010

One of our earliest specimens, the Hilarofustis atarium (2010) occupies the same place on the food chain as Dominaludus (commonly referred to as the Nintendo Controller), but predates it by several years. Examples of this particular species are somewhat rare, especially today, as so many other species have come to take its place. Hilarofustis atarium is included in the surrounding matrix (stone base) and coloration varies from a light gray to reddish to brownish to a dark gray.